17 years ago

17 years ago, on September 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked four U.S. commercial airplanes. The first two were crashed into the towers of the World Trade Center. The third plane hit the Pentagon and the fourth one crashed in a field in Pennsylvania after passengers fought back against the terrorists. Almost 3,000 people died that day. Since then, there have been many security changes in public places like, schools, airports, and train stations.
Before 9/11, private security companies oversaw airport screenings. Two months after the attacks the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created as a part of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act, which gave the federal government direct responsibility for all airport screenings. The TSA supervises security on all of the country’s transportation systems. Security agents now ride aboard every airplane undetected, but still trained to act in similar incidents to 9/11 to ensure safety. The TSA even looks out for suspicious behavior, like “exaggerated yawning,” “gazing down” and “widely open staring eyes” to “face pale from recent shaving of beard,” “rubbing or wringing of hands,” and “wearing improper attire for location.”
You could also bring a lot of things on board an airplane that you aren’t allowed to have with you today, like knives up to 4 inches long because they weren’t considered intimidating. You were also allowed to have baseball bats, box cutters, and darts. Knitting needles,scissors, and large printer cartridges. Now, all those things are prohibited. Later, the TSA banned all liquids from carry-on bags after terrorists tried to set off liquid explosives. A month after that, the rule was changed and passengers were allowed to have carry-on liquids, gels, and aerosols/sprays as long as they were in containers of 3.4 ounces or less in a single, clear, resealable 1 quart plastic bag. Airports have changed a lot since 9/11, but they aren’t the only public places that have changed.
School security has also gone through many changes. Before September 11, 2001, some schools had plans in place to respond to emergencies, but many of the school employees who were responsible for carrying out those emergency plans were not properly trained to do so. Federal funds, through the U.S. Department of Education’s Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools grant program-have been given to many school systems so that they can improve their emergency plans. Now, almost all schools have emergency plans, lock down drills, and fire drills, so that the students can be prepared. Schools also have electronic doors, so that they can control who can come in an out of the building; ID badges so that only students and staff can enter; and security guards and security cameras. Some high schools even have metal detectors at the entrances.
Even train stations have increased security. Trains have been designed to be more crash withstanding. Passenger Train Emergency Preparedness regulations were published by the FRA that made it mandatory for train stations to have emergency response plans in place to handle possible emergencies.

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