Jack’s barbaric nature reveals him as a representation of the id

Jack’s barbaric nature reveals him as a representation of the id. Freud theorizes that the id is “the source of your bodily needs, wants, desires, and impulses,” and it is the “most selfish part of our mind.” The id focuses on “pleasure principle” and the satisfaction of a person’s need, which is the exact representation of Jack. Much like the id, Jack only cares about his needs and wants. Jack is frequently portrayed going against the leadership and rules that Ralph establishes. Unwilling to conform to rules and order, Jack attempts to become the chief to have his ways. During one of the meetings, Ralph speaks about the rules but Jack interrupts and says, “‘Bollocks to the rules! We’re strong-we hunt! If there’s a beast, we’ll hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat-!'” (Golding 83). Jack’s greed of killing the “beast” and taking over the society ends with results such as the deaths of Piggy and Simon and a divisor between the society. Jack’s true intentions may not have been to kill Piggy and Simon, but the outcomes are from the results of his satisfaction and cravings. Jack reveals he will do whatever he wants in order to satisfy his needs, similar to how the id is the “the most selfish part of our mind” and it “is only concerned with the immediate satisfaction…”. Much like CommonLit staff’s explanation of Freud’s theory on the id, Jack is very similar to this psyche based on his actions throughout the novel.
The ego is shown through Ralph as he makes various attempts to become rescued from the island. The ego is “the rational part of our mind.” The article explains Freud’s theory of the ego, that it “acts according to the reality principle” and that it “seeks to please the id’s drive in realistic ways that will benefit in the long term rather than bring grief”. The ego is the “mediator ‘between id and reality'”. Based on these descriptions by Freud, the ego is represented best by Ralph. Ralph is the leader of the boys and strives for the good of the group. When he is chosen as the leader, he logically explains to the boys, “‘There’s no village smoke, and no boats. We’ll make sure later; but I think it’s uninhabited'” (Golding 28). After identifying what needs to be done, he organizes groups to build shelter, establishes the use of the conch for order, holds debates for the boys’ voices to be heard, and makes a fire to signal to ships that there are people on the island. Ralph’s rational nature is displays his leadership and works to find ways to help everyone on the island. Furthermore, when Ralph finds the conch, he shows is rationality when he states,”‘We can use this to call the others. Have a meeting. They’ll come when they hear us-‘” (Golding 15). The conch is an example that symbolizes rule and order and Ralph’s actions indicate his representation of the ego.
Piggy’s attempts to make right decisions exemplifies the superego.

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