The surrender of Germany and the atomic bombs dropped by the United States on Japan may have ended World War II

The surrender of Germany and the atomic bombs dropped by the United States on Japan may have ended World War II, the the battle continued far into the future on American soil. Most Americans have never heard of Operation Paperclip, but even fewer understand what occurred during this revolutionary time. After WWII, U.S. intelligence programs brought 1,600 scientists, 88 of those being high ranking Nazi German scientists, into America under secret military contracts to research and develop new weapons for the United States military (Lewis 2016). According to Annie Jacobsen (2014), author of Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America,
…the scientists who assisted the Third Reich wage war against the Allies continued their weapons-related work for the U.S. government, developing rockets, chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction, aviation and space medicine (for enhancing military pilot and astronaut performance), and many other armaments at a feverish and paranoid pace that came to define the Cold War. (p. ix)
Operation Paperclip was a historical example of the twisted motives of the American government, compiled with secret deals, dark research of weapons, and the advancement of America’s space program under the leadership of high ranking Nazi scientists.
The United States government first approached this idea as the war was closing, understanding that the Soviet Union was arming themselves for the future. During the war, Hitler had created his whole arsenal of nerve agents, even a weaponized form of the bubonic plague. American troops found these terrifying weapons, and soon word returned to the Pentagon. After many hours of debating of the subject, America realized that we need these weapons for ourselves and for the protection of our citizens (Lewis 2016). As Nazi Germans stood trial at Nuremberg, the United States arranged for a group of Hitler’s top “brains” to be transported to the states before the Soviets could jump at the chance to obtain their help. American officials were frightened by the idea of the Soviet Union could gaining the advantage by enlisting these scientists to help their cause. In May of 1945 , the United States began secret deals to transport the scientists and their families to the states for research and development. The decision of splitting Nazi German scientists between the branches of the military was based on the need for research in each branch and the scientists’ perceived threats to the United States (Jacoben 2014).
Only this period of time where the Nazi scientists were being transported and began research for the United States is referred to as Operation Paperclip (Lewis 2016). Although these Nazi scientists committed horrible acts during WWII, their efforts in America are still remembered today. Of course, all Paperclip scientists are deceased now, but their names live on. The majority of them won multiple military and science awards for service in Third Reich and won awards in the United States for top military and civilian acts. As of 2013, two Nazi scientists have prestigious science awards given in their name annually and one had a U.S. government building named after him. Due to the fact that these scientists came to the United States through a deranged system, their contributions to the American government was crucial during the Cold War.
Operation Paperclip was not completely top secret; many knew of the weapons and technologies invented during the war which were used on the battlefield and in the concentration camps. However, few government officials knew of the weapons that were being created here on American soil. The arsenal created by these scientists included heat-seeking ballistic missiles, sarin gas cluster bombs, underground bunkers, space capsules, and a new version of weaponized bubonic plague . Sarin gas is highly toxic synthetic compound used as a nerve gas, 26 times more deadly than cyanide (Jacobsen 2014). The bubonic plague, otherwise known as “The Black Death”, was a world-wide epidemic during the Renaissance and since then, Nazi German scientists were researching the bacterial DNA to harness the disease to become four times as deadly. During this time period, medicine was not as advance as it is today and this weaponized bubonic plague could kill a platoon of soldiers in a small window of time (Jacobson 2014).

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